Minerals, Info about their importance for the organism - HSN
Home / Nutrition / Minerals

Minerals

Minerals

What are Minerals?

Minerals are natural inorganic substances with a defined and predictable chemical composition and physical properties.

Minerals are as important for our health as vitamins.

They are crucial for our growth, metabolism, absorption of vitamins and other nutrients. Apart from preventing and healing diseases as well as being involved in all the biochemical processes of the body.

A deficiency will occur if there is a lack of one or more minerals. They tend to develop slowly and they can have serious consequences if they are not treated. In the first stages, the symptoms can be so mild that they are not even detected. When they become quite obvious, our health may be already affected by this deficiency.

Main Minerals

Classification of Minerals

Macrominerals (amounts higher than 100mg daily)

  • Calcium
  • Potassium
  • Magnesium
  • Phosphorus
  • Sodium
  • Chloride
  • Sulphur

Trace elements (only traces)

List of Minerals

Next Prev

Calcium

Mineral Calcium

What are its main functions?

  • Bone and teeth health, it preserves their hardness and density.
  • Nervous system: regulation of the release of neurotransmitters for a proper functioning of the nerve impulses.
  • Muscle contraction: it produces the calmodulin protein which is in charge of giving energy to the muscles so that they can perform a proper contraction.
  • Regulation of the production of insulin and other hormones.
  • Metabolizing fats.

What are the symptoms of a deficiency?

  • Deficiency in the diet: we can run out of calcium due to a lack of of this mineral in the diet which can result in bone weakness, leading to a case of osteoporosis.
  • Hypocalcemia: low levels of calcium in the blood due to some kind of external agent (medicines) or a pathology or disease. It can force our body to use bone calcium for the maintenance of the blood calcium levels.
  • A continuous deficiency: arrhythmia, high blood pressure.

What are the most common sources?

  • Dairy products, broccoli, fish, cabbage, almonds, egg yolk…

It is better absorbed with…

  • Vitamin C, D, E and K, apart from the minerals magnesium and boron.

What is the Recommended Daily Amount (nutrient reference value 1169/2011 of 25th October 2011)?

  • 800mg.

Chromium

Mineral Chromium

What are its main functions?

  • It is involved in the metabolism of fat and carbohydrates.
  • It regulates the blood sugar levels through the molecule chromodulin which supports the absorption of glucose with the help of insulin.
  • It is involved in the synthesis of fatty acids, cholesterol and enzymes.
  • It improves the blood triglycerides levels.

What are the symptoms of a deficiency?

  • Diets high in processed food containing simple sugars can trigger a deficiency of this mineral.
  • It is also frequent among the elderly.
  • The tolerance to glucose can be lowered.
  • Possible glaucoma.

What are the most common sources?

  • Meat, oysters, eggs, barley, oats, green vegetables…

It is better absorbed with…

  • Vitamin C. Iron and zinc hinder its absorption and their own as well..

What is the Recommended Daily Amount (nutrient reference value 1169/2011 of 25th October 2011)?

  • 40mcg.

Copper

Mineral Copper

What are its main functions?

  • It is involved in the production of red blood cells along with iron.
  • Maintenance of the blood vessels, nerves, immune system and bones.
  • It is essential to support the tasks of the connective tissues, eyes and hair.
  • It regulates the functioning of the thyroid gland as well as the heartbeat.
  • It sets metabolic processes into motion with the help of amino acids and vitamins.

What are the symptoms of a deficiency?

  • It is not that frequent, but a deficiency can result in anemia and osteoporosis.

What are the most common sources?

  • Seafood, legumes, nuts, vegetables, whole grains…

It is better absorbed with…

  • Calcium, manganese and zinc.

What is the Recommended Daily Amount (nutrient reference value 1169/2011 of 25th October 2011)?

  • 1mg.

Iron

Mineral Iron

What are its main functions?

  • It is involved in the production of hemoglobin, which is presents in the red blood cells and which is in charge of transporting the oxygen to the cells of the body.
  • At the same time, it takes the carbon dioxide (waste) to the lungs where it is breathed out.

What are the symptoms of a deficiency?

  • Who is mainly affected? Vegetarians, vegans and menstruating women.
  • Anemia, which is one of the main symptoms of general weakness and tiredness, paleness and a faster heart rate.

What are the most common sources?

  • Meat, eggs, green leaf vegetables, legumes…

It is better absorbed with…

  • Vitamin C. Avoid taking it with dairy products. Phytates and tannins hinder their absorption, such as: coffee or tea, wheat bran or soy, eggs and spinach

What is the Recommended Daily Amount (nutrient reference value 1169/2011 of 25th October 2011)?

  • 14mg.

Magnesium

Mineral Magnesium

What are its main functions?

  • It is involved in more than 300 physiological processes: regulating the body temperature, transmission of electric impulses, metabolism and energy production.

What are the symptoms of a deficiency?

  • Those foods that are high in phytic acid can reduce the availability of this mineral, since they “steal” the nutrients. Moreover, those who have problems related to alcohol or leaky gut syndrome can also suffer said deficit.
  • In this case, the symptoms of a deficiency tend to be: headaches, anxiety, loss of appetite, fatigue, tiredness, muscle weakness, somnolence. More serious consequences would be: kidney problems, Crohn’s disease, palpitations, depression

What are the symptoms of a deficiency?

  • Almonds, cashews, seeds, green leaf vegetables, fish, beans, lentils, avocados, bananas, herring, tuna,…

It is better absorbed with…

  • Vitamin C.

What is the Recommended Daily Amount (nutrient reference value 1169/2011 of 25th October 2011)?

  • 375mg.

Molybdenum

Mineral Molybdenum

What are its main functions?

  • It performs metabolic tasks to maintain a correct balance of our health.
  • It supports the detoxification of substances inside our body.
  • It is involved in the production of uric acid and the sulphur metabolism.

What are the symptoms of a deficiency?

  • A deficiency of this mineral is quite rare, it can only be caused by undernourishment or some associated pathology, such as Crohn’s disease. Some of its symptoms are an accelerated heartbeat, breathing problems or headaches.

What are the most common sources?

  • Nuts, whole grain cereals, vegetables, cheese, beans…

It is better avoid consuming it with…

  • Copper, since the intake of copper supplements can worsen a molybdenum deficit

What is the Recommended Daily Amount (nutrient reference value 1169/2011 of 25th October 2011)?

  • 50mcg.

Phosphorus

Mineral Phosphorus

What are its main functions?

  • It is present in each cell of our body and it performs functions to preserve and repair the cells, the proper use of fats, proteins and carbohydrates.
  • It is involved in the formation of the bones and teeth.
  • It supports the synthesis of ATP.
  • It is involved in the functioning of the liver, muscle contraction, heartbeat and nerve transmission.

What are the symptoms of a deficiency?

  • B vitamins, riboflavin and niacin cannot be absorbed without phosphorus.
  • It can result in anorexia and obesity, physical tiredness, a bad functioning of the nervous system and breathing problems.

What are the most common sources?

  • Meat, milk, whole grain cereals, eggs, nuts and seeds…

It is better absorbed with…

  • Vitamin D. High doses of iron and magnesium hinder its absorption.

What is the Recommended Daily Amount (nutrient reference value 1169/2011 of 25th October 2011)?

  • 700mg.

Selenium

Mineral Selenium

What are its main functions?

  • It has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, and it performs an important task in cardiovascular health, regulating the thyroid gland and improving the cognitive function.

What are the symptoms of a deficiency?

  • Lack of energy, hypothyroidism, mental tiredness, problems in the reproductive organs

What are the most common sources?

  • Meat, eggs, fish, grains, Brazil nuts

It is better absorbed with…

  • Seleniomethionine is a form of selenium that improves its absorption

What is the Recommended Daily Amount (nutrient reference value 1169/2011 of 25th October 2011)?

  • 55mcg.

Zinc

Mineral Zinc

What are its main functions?

  • It is involved in the cell metabolism, enzymatic processes, it contributes to the immune function, the synthesis of proteins and DNA; it plays an important task in the cell division process; it supports a proper growth and development during pregnancy, childhood and adolescence

What are the symptoms of a deficiency?

  • Vegans or those who eat little meat are prone to suffer a deficiency. The possible symptoms are: frequent infections, hair loss, problems with the senses of taste and smell, wounds that take a long time to heal…

What are the most common sources?

  • Fish, meat, whole grains, walnuts, egg yolk…

It is better absorbed with…

  • Its chelated forms

What is the Recommended Daily Amount (nutrient reference value 1169/2011 of 25th October 2011)?

  • 10mg.

Iodine

Mineral Iodine

What are its main functions?

  • Regulating the metabolism (a proper functioning of the thyroid gland).

What are the symptoms of a deficiency?

  • It can reduce the production of two hormones: triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4), which can lead to hypothyroidism.

What are the most common sources?

  • Dairy products, Seaweed, fish, eggs, salt, soy sauce…

It is better absorbed with…

  • The easiest way to absorb it is to take iodide.

What is the Recommended Daily Amount (nutrient reference value 1169/2011 of 25th October 2011)?

  • 150mcg.

Fluorine

Mineral Fluorine

What are its main functions?

  • It helps to reduce caries on the teeth.
  • It preserves the bone structure.
  • You can use low doses of fluoride salts to treat disorders that trigger a bone loss that is faster than normal, like menopause.

What are the symptoms of a deficiency?

  • Higher chances of developing caries
  • Risk of suffering osteoporosis

What are the most common sources?

  • Sardines, salmon, tea, shrimp, raisins, grape juice…

It is better absorbed…

  • Avoiding calcium.

What is the Recommended Daily Amount (nutrient reference value 1169/2011 of 25th October 2011)?

  • 3.5mg

Potassium

Mineral Potassium

What are its main functions?

  • It is used by the body in processes to build proteins (and muscle indirectly), to maintain a correct growth of the body, break down carbs, control the electric activity of the heart and to maintain a normal blood pressure.

What are the symptoms of a deficiency?

  • Feeling tired and weak
  • Irregular heartbeat
  • High blood pressure
  • Muscle cramps

What are the most common sources?

Beans, potatoes, yogurt, bananas, peaches, tuna, avocado…

It is better absorbed with…

  • Avoiding products with a high sodium content.

What is the Recommended Daily Amount (nutrient reference value 1169/2011 of 25th October 2011)?

  • 2000mg.

Chloride

Chloride Mineral

What are its main functions?

  • It is necessary to control the balance of bodily fluids and it is an essential elements that make up the digestive juice.
  • It keeps a proper volume and the pressure of the blood flow.
  • It can help to preserve the potassium.

What are the symptoms of a deficiency?

A chloride deficiency is known as hypochloremia (it produces excessive sweating, certain renal disorders…). It is rare, in fact, those who are prone to consuming more chloride than necessary due to diets that contain a lot of salt.

What are the most common sources?

  • Salt, seaweed, rye, tomatos, lettuce, olives, celery…

It is better absorbed with…

  • Potassium
  • Sodium
  • Chloride

What is the Recommended Daily Amount (nutrient reference value 1169/2011 of 25th October 2011)?

  • 800mg.

Next Prev
Content Protection by DMCA.com
4

Vitamin D is an indispensable element for the absorption of Calcium in the human body. It helps to maintain a healthy bone mineral density that prevents the problems that can be caused by a deficiency of this mineral. Bone Mineral Density and Osteoporosis The bone tissue from the body is made up of heterogeneous material. First, there is a mineral …

Read More »
5

If you know that it is important to follow a healthy lifestyle, you also know that you have to eat foods rich in calcium to keep the body in perfect conditions In general, we tend to overlook their value in our lives. This is why we want to inform you about such an important topic by explaining the properties of …

Read More »
6

There are other non-dairy sources of calcium that can be used by those who suffer milk allergy or intolerance. They need to consume them in order to avoid a deficiency of this mineral in their body. Calcium is an essential mineral that improves the health of our bones, muscles, immune system function and hormone release. On average, an adult needs …

Read More »
7

A calcium deficiency, which is the main mineral from our body, is more common than what we can think. Its deficit can cause different symptoms and health problems. Consequences and symptoms of a calcium deficiency Calcium is the main from our body, which is why we have to be careful with its intake. Some of the main consequences of a …

Read More »
8

We constantly hear how important Calcium is to keep our bones and teeth strong, especially in such important stages as growth, menopause, pregnancy and lactation, for physical exercise… But, do we know what it actually is? What it is for? What problems can we have with a or an excess of this mineral? Which are the best sources? What is …

Read More »
10

Magnesium is a macromineral that plays an important role in metabolic functions, like activating enzymes and the nervous system, as well as structural functions, such as helping with the formation of bones and teeth or the functioning of the muscles. It is also essential for the absorption of calcium and potassium and it facilitates the glycolysis. Apart from all these …

Read More »
11

Before reviewing those foods that are rich in magnesium we have to mention that it is the fourth most abundant chemical element in the composition of the human body (two thirds of it are found in the bones), accounting for a 0.05%. It is macromineral along with sodium, calcium, phosphorus, potassium, chlorine and sulfur, minerals that require more than 100 …

Read More »
12

Cooking reduces the magnesium content even in those food that contain a high percentage of this mineral. In addition, a diet that is high in protein and consuming alcohol, coffee or sugar, contribute to reducing the magnesium levels in the body. Food sources that contain magnesium include algae, green-leaf vegetables, walnuts, seeds, and dark chocolate. Unfortunately, in many cases, people …

Read More »
13

There is not a specific universal dose of magnesium. The amount of magnesium that each person requires depends on several factors, including age and sex. In general, the official recommended daily amount (RDA) of magnesium is 400 milligrams daily. However, there are people who need a much higher dose, because they can suffer palpitations, cramps, and muscle tension if they …

Read More »
14

Muscle cramps are quite common among sportspeople. They are mainly caused by a magnesium deficiency. Why do Muscle Cramps happen? We often ignore that magnesium is an important electrolyte that must be recharged when it is lost due to stress, sweating, or a bad diet. Magnesium cannot be properly measured through a blood test. But thousands of doctors and athletes …

Read More »
15

Your body needs little amounts of chromium, a mineral that is essential for the metabolism of glucose and the production of energy. A proper dose of chromium would be 35mcg for men between 19 and 50 years old, and 25mcg for women of the same age. Chromium picolinate is a form of chromium available as dietary supplements. You should be …

Read More »
16

deficiencies are quite common nowadays since there are still people who are not aware of the importance of this nutrient for our health Zinc and Testosterone Increase What is Testosterone? Testosterone is one of the most important hormones when it comes to creating muscle mass and strengthening the bones. In fact, it is responsible for the sexual features which are …

Read More »
17

Magnesium is an essential mineral that must be obtained from the diet or through supplementation in order to avoid possible deficiencies. Importance of Magnesium Magnesium supplements contribute to reducing tiredness and fatigue and also support the energy metabolism. It plays a fundamental role in obtaining cell energy, called ATP. All enzymes that create or use ATP need magnesium ions. A …

Read More »
18

Magnesium is involved in the production of more than 300 essential enzymes for the body. This shows how important it is for the performance and energy of the organism. Magnesium relaxes the muscles and prevents muscle cramps. It is a remedy against stress, it regulates the blood pressure and prevents cardiac insufficiency. Magnesium is the most valuable mineral for the …

Read More »
Do you like our HSNBlog?
HSN Newsletter
Then, you can imagine the offers that we have at our store.

Leave us your email and we will grant you access to the best promotions for our customers


I want to subscribe and I agree to the privacy policy